Zori Slippers

September 11 - September 12, 2021

Zori Slippers

$335.00

Details Fee Breakdown:
Tuition: $335

Zori slippers are made in many parts of the world and were probably the first shoes worn by people – made of grass, fiber, animal hide or just rags, resembling our modern day rubber flip flops. Join Sana, who studied this craft in Africa, India and Japan, and make your own pair! See samples from world travels, most made from beautiful old worn out clothing and textiles. Take home your first pair and have the skills to make more!

Level: Beginner and Beyond
Workshop Levels

Definitions of Skill Levels for Workshops

  • Beginner and Beyond: Introductory level course that presents basic knowledge of tools, materials and techniques and is geared towards first timers or those who want to improve and expand their technique. It takes time to build skills.
  • Advanced Beginner and Beyond: Instruction that assumes some familiarity with tools, materials and equipment. Includes reviews and builds on basic skill sets, allows for those with more experience to work at their own pace. Further development of fundamentals, participants have had at least one class or equivalent with professional instruction.
  • Intermediate: Course content that assumes a working knowledge of basic studio tools, materials and equipment necessary to accomplish the projects and techniques to be explored. Participants feel comfortable in the studio setting.
  • Intermediate to Advanced: Course content that requires a proficient working knowledge of studio tools, materials and equipment necessary to accomplish the projects and techniques to be explored in class.
  • Advanced: Assumes proficiency and advanced working knowledge of materials and studio tools and equipment so that the focus is on artistic narrative and/or technical development.
Ages: Adult

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ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Sana Musasama

Sana Musasama received her BA from City College of New York, NY and her MFA from Alfred University. Musasama began traveling as a way to recover identity and cultural place. Clay was a geographical catalyst that brought her first to West Africa. She studied Mende pottery in Sierra Leone and ventured later to Japan, China, South America and Cambodia. She has continued her quest, expanding her interests to tribal adornment practices in various indigenous cultures. She is challenged by the concerns surrounding the safety of women, specifically the rituals involving rites of passage, female chastity and the “purification” of the female body. Musasama’s work is informed by history, women’s studies, culture and her travel journal.

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